#God

  • A Critical Examination of Jonathan Edwards’s Doctrine of the Trinity | Ralph Cunnington
    This article critically examines Jonathan Edwards’s doctrine of the Trinity with a particular focus upon his understanding of the person of the Holy Spirit. While his restatement of Augustinian orthodoxy served the church well during a time of great doctrinal heterodoxy, it created some problems of its own. These problems were rooted in his use…
  • A Japanese Perspective on the Trinity | Nozomu Miyahira
    The Christian doctrine of the Trinity has traditionally been expressed in terms of three persons and one substance or being. This belief and formulation is taken for granted by orthodox Christians. But a question may emerge when we take into consideration the fact that, although the gospel itself is universally relevant, unrestricted to any particular…
  • A Spirited Humanity: The Trinitarian Ecclesiology of Colin Gunton | Themelios
    Conflict in relationships is often rooted in inappropriate or unmet expectations. This commonplace wisdom regarding everyday relationships is no less true of one’s relationship to the church. Our conduct and feelings toward the church are governed largely by our expectations of what the church should be. These expectations, furthermore, are rooted in our understanding of…
  • B. B. Warfield and the Biblical Doctrine of the Trinity | Scott R. Swain
    B. B. Warfield’s 1915 ISBE article on the Trinity presents the Princeton theologian’s mature thinking on the biblical bases and meaning of the doctrine and offers a revisionist interpretation of the personal names of “Father,” “Son,” and “Spirit.” Instead of interpreting the personal names of the Trinity in terms of relations of origin, Warfield argues…
  • Christocentrism: An Asymmetrical Trinitarianism? | Themelios
    Does “Christocentrism” betray an asymmetrical trinitarianism that neglects the Father and the Spirit? The spate of calls for “Christ-centeredness” in evangelicalism’s past few generations collude with the twentieth century’s revivified trinitarianism to prompt this question. After laying out the tension with a brief historical overview, we will bring the teaching of the NT to bear…
  • Divine Revelation: God Making Himself Known | John M. Frame
    God makes himself known to his creatures because he first knows himself perfectly as a personal, speaking God. Although all people suppress the knowledge of God in their sin, he has clearly communicated about himself to his creatures through the creation and through human’s being made in the image of God. On top of this general revelation,…
  • Divine Simplicity | Matthew Barrett
    God is not made up of parts, nor is he compounded or composite in nature. That means he does not possess attributes, as if his attributes are one thing and his essence another. Rather, his essence is his attributes and his attributes his essence. God is his attributes. That means, all that is in God…
  • God as Father | Gerald Bray
    In the Old Testament, God is the Father of Israel (and Israel is his son) in the context of God forgiving and redeeming Israel. While the Jews of Jesus’s day were hesitant to call God their Father (and angry at Jesus for doing so), Jesus claimed God as his Father and taught his followers to…
  • The Eternality and Aseity of God | John M. Frame
    God’s aseity means that he is sufficient to himself, independent of anything outside himself. God’s eternality is his aseity with respect to time: Lord of time, existing above and apart from it, but free to enter it to accomplish his purposes. The Bible teaches God’s aseity by saying that he does not need anything beyond…
  • The Glory of God | Christopher Morgan
    The glory of God is interwoven throughout the biblical story and forms the origin, content, and goal of the entire cosmic narrative. God’s glory is the magnificence, worth, loveliness, and grandeur of his many perfections. God communicates his glory through his creation, image-bearers, providence, and redemptive acts. God’s people respond by glorifying him. God receives…
  • The Identity of the Holy Spirit: A Problem in Trinitarian Theology | John Webster
    Christian theology has been traditionally reticent in its talk of the Holy Spirit. In his Letters to Serapion, one of the classic texts of Christian pneumatology, Athanasius counselled restraint in view of the ineffability of the Spirit as one who entirely transcends the world of creatures. Such restraint is, however, not simply the fruit of due modesty…
  • The Immutability and Impassibility of God | Matthew Barrett
    Immutability and Impassibility are key, historic attributes the church has confessed, attributes that distinguish the infinite and eternal Creator from the finite and temporal creature. Immutability means God does not change in any way; he is unchanging and for that reason perfect in every way. Impassibility, a corollary to immutability, means God does not experience…
  • The Names of God | Daniel J. Ebert IV
    Divine names in the Bible are integral to God’s self-revelation. They are best studied along the Bible’s storyline using appropriate interpretive principles. God’s primary names, with many additional designations, are initially revealed in the Old Testament. The Bible also makes explicit statements about God’s names; this is particularly true of His personal name YHWH (Yahweh),…
  • The Omnipotence, Omniscience, and Omnipresence of God | John M. Frame
    The three “omni” attributes of God characterize him as all-powerful, all-knowing, and everywhere present. Each of these involves the other two, and each provides a perspective on the all-embracing lordship of the true God. Omnipotence means that God is in total control of himself and his creation. Omniscience means that he is the ultimate criterion…
  • The Spirituality of God | John M. Frame
    God’s spirituality refers not only to his immateriality and invisibility, but also to the fact that he works in the world with the power of the Holy Spirit. Spirit in Scripture refers to God as the third person of the Trinity, and to an attribute that he displays in all his works. As spirit, God is…
  • The Trinity—Yesterday, Today and the Future | Robert Letham
    In 1967 Karl Rahner famously drew attention to the then widespread neglect of the Trinity, claiming that ‘should the doctrine of the Trinity have to be dropped as false, the major part of religious literature could well remain virtually unchanged’. Since then a raft of works have appeared, volumes by the truckload, but as far…
  • The Wrath of God | David Schrock
    God’s wrath, in perfect harmony with all of his divine attributes, is the holy action of retributive justice towards persons whose actions deserve eternal condemnation. Despite the disinterest of our secular age and many in the evangelical church, the wrath of God is a deeply biblical truth. It affirms God’s righteous displeasure with sin and…
  • Trinitarian Agency and the Eternal Subordination of the Son: An Augustinian Perspective | Themelios
    In recent years a debate has emerged among conservative evangelicals over the “eternal functional subordination” (EFS) of the Son. At the center of this dispute is the question of how we are to understand scriptural teaching regarding the nature of the Son’s eternal relationship to the Father. Is the obedience of the Son to the…
  • Trinitarianism in the Early Church | Coleman Ford
    Evangelicals have much to consider when it comes to trinitarian reflection in the early church. First, the early church vigorously defended the Trinity from Scripture. Understanding the Trinity was not an exercise in proof-texting or philosophical sophistry, but rather deep Holy Spirit-driven whole-Bible reading. Their trinitarian consciousness was woven throughout their writing, their worship, and…
  • Trinity, Creation, and Re-creation: A Comparison of Karl Barth and Herman Bavinck’s Trinitarian Doctrines of Creation | Jarred Jung
    Karl Barth’s doctrine of creation, while rooted in his doctrine of the Trinity, errs in the way that creation is conflated into re-creation, resulting in a diminished doctrine of creation at the expense of his christological Trinitarianism. By comparing Barth’s doctrine of creation with that of Dutch Reformed theologian Herman Bavinck, this article argues that…
  • Why our Evangelism Must be Trinitarian | Stephen N. Williams
    … Or why should it be? A case: a church in its evangelistic preaching proclaims that there is a God from whom we are alienated who sent His Son to die for us so that we, believing in him, may have eternal life. Some believe. Later on they are inducted into belief in the Trinity. This…